ISB ranked no. 12 in FT’s Global B-School Rankings!

The Indian School of Business (ISB), my alma mater, has been ranked no. 12 in the latest Financial Times (London) global B-School rankings! Way to go!

Here is a link to the rankings: http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/global-mba-rankings

The official press release from ISB can be found at http://www.isb.edu/media/UsrNewsMgmt.aspx?topicID=138 and a portion of it is repeated below:

The Indian School of Business (ISB) has been ranked No: 12 in the global B-school rankings released today by the Financial Times, London. This is the third successive year that the ISB has featured among the top 20, in the list of top 100 B-schools in the world. Previously, ISB was ranked 15th in 2009 and 20th in 2008.

“We began with the idea of creating a school in India that would rank among the best in the world. Today, I am delighted that the ISB is consolidating its position as a top-ranked global business school. To receive this news on the eve of the completion of 60 years of the Indian Republic makes it all the more special. I congratulate the entire ISB community on this success” said Rajat Gupta, Chairman, ISB.
Echoing this sentiment, Ajit Rangnekar, Dean, ISB said, “This is indeed a proud moment for the ISB. Our goal has always been to pursue excellence in education and research. As an outcome of this effort, we accept any ranking that we get with humility, and rededicate ourselves to this goal. I would like to thank our alumni, our faculty, students, staff, our board, our associate schools, industry and our well wishers for contributing to this continuing success.”
The ISB was established in 2001 with the launch of its pioneering Post Graduate Programme in Management (PGPM). From an initial class of 126 students, the school has grown successively over the years, and currently has 570 students in the class of 2010. The school has over 2300 alumni who are making a strong impact in business and industry. The school has also established itself as a leader in Executive Education through its programmes designed and delivered for private and public sector corporations, small and medium enterprises, and central and state governments. The ISB faculty research papers are consistently published by top ranked peer reviewed international journals.
After a successful first phase of growth, the ISB has now entered its second phase of growth and expansion. It recently launched its second Post Graduate Programme in Management for Senior Executives (PGPMAX), which has generated a lot of interest among senior business professionals. It will soon set up its second campus in Mohali, Punjab. The first academic session at the ISB campus in Mohali is expected to commence in 2012.

The Indian School of Business (ISB) has been ranked No: 12 in the global B-school rankings released today by the Financial Times, London. This is the third successive year that the ISB has featured among the top 20, in the list of top 100 B-schools in the world. Previously, ISB was ranked 15th in 2009 and 20th in 2008.

“We began with the idea of creating a school in India that would rank among the best in the world. Today, I am delighted that the ISB is consolidating its position as a top-ranked global business school. To receive this news on the eve of the completion of 60 years of the Indian Republic makes it all the more special. I congratulate the entire ISB community on this success” said Rajat Gupta, Chairman, ISB.

Echoing this sentiment, Ajit Rangnekar, Dean, ISB said, “This is indeed a proud moment for the ISB. Our goal has always been to pursue excellence in education and research. As an outcome of this effort, we accept any ranking that we get with humility, and rededicate ourselves to this goal. I would like to thank our alumni, our faculty, students, staff, our board, our associate schools, industry and our well wishers for contributing to this continuing success.”

The ISB was established in 2001 with the launch of its pioneering Post Graduate Programme in Management (PGPM). From an initial class of 126 students, the school has grown successively over the years, and currently has 570 students in the class of 2010. The school has over 2300 alumni who are making a strong impact in business and industry. The school has also established itself as a leader in Executive Education through its programmes designed and delivered for private and public sector corporations, small and medium enterprises, and central and state governments. The ISB faculty research papers are consistently published by top ranked peer reviewed international journals.

After a successful first phase of growth, the ISB has now entered its second phase of growth and expansion. It recently launched its second Post Graduate Programme in Management for Senior Executives (PGPMAX), which has generated a lot of interest among senior business professionals. It will soon set up its second campus in Mohali, Punjab. The first academic session at the ISB campus in Mohali is expected to commence in 2012.

2 states – the story of my marriage (Chetan Bhagat)

Chetan Bhagat’s “2 states – the story of my marriage(Fiction, Rupa & Co., Oct 2009), said to be inspired from happenings in his own life, is a story of how two IIM-A classmates – Krish Malhotra (a Punjabi boy) and Ananya Swaminathan  (a Tamil girl) fall in love with each other but have to deal with the problem of their parents not agreeing to their marriage.

Though the plot is very predictable and very much like the way most Bollywood movies would tackle such a subject, Chetan kept my attention throughout with his simple, witty writing. Having lived in the north (with many Punjabi friends) and by virtue of my living now in Chennai, I could relate to a lot of things Chetan has written. Given that Chetan’s books usually come across as apt material or as inspiration for movie scripts, we will have to see if a movie is made out of this one. Or may be he wrote the book with a movie project in mind/ already signed.

50 Maestros, 50 Recordings

50 Maestros, 50 Recordings” (HarperCollins Publishers, Dec 2009) is a tribute to select masters of Indian Classical Music who influenced its authors Amaan Ali Khan and Ayaan Ali Khan (sons of sarod maestro Amjad Ali Khan) the most. It starts with a very brief introduction to Indian Music – Carnatic and Hindustani, with a short explanation of some of the most often used terms in both the systems. There is a short chapter on each of the great artists consisting of

  • a short ‘bio’-like introduction
  • memories of the authors’ interaction with the artist or of having heard their father or of other elderly musicians talk about the artist
  • a list of select recordings of the artist
  • photographs of the artists, many a times taken with the authors

The book also comes along with a CD that contains 27 tracks performed by some of the artists covered in the book.

The target audience seems to be people looking for an introduction to Indian music and its maestros. It could include people who are new to one or both systems of Indian Classical music (Carnatic and Hindustani) and need help in identifying whom to and what to listen to. The book is certainly not a collection of biographies or a detailed account of what constitutes Carnatic or Hindustani music and anybody reading the book with such expectations is bound to get disappointed.

The artists covered in the book are:

  • Ustad Abdul Halim Jaffer Khan
  • Ustad Abdul Karim Khan
  • Ustad Ahmed Jaan Thirakhwa
  • Ustad Ali Akbar Khan
  • Ustad Amir Khan
  • Ustad Amjad Ali Khan
  • Dr. M. Balamuralikrishna
  • Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan
  • Begum Akhtar
  • Pandit Bhimsen Joshi
  • Ustad Bismillah Khan
  • D.K. Pattammal
  • Pandit D.V. Paluskar
  • Ustad Enayat Khan
  • Ustad Faiyaz Khan
  • Dr. Gangubai Hangal
  • Ustad Ghulam Mustafa Khan
  • Girija Devi
  • Ustad Haafiz Ali Khan
  • Pandit Hari Prasad Chaurasia
  • Ustad Imdad Khan
  • Pandit Jasraj
  • Surashri Kesarbhai Kerkar
  • Pandit Kishan Maharaj
  • Kishori Amonkar
  • Pandit Kumar Gandharva
  • Dr. L. Subramaniam
  • Maharajapuram V. Santhanam
  • M.L. Vasanthakumari
  • Mogubai Kurdikar
  • M.S. Subbulakshmi
  • Pandit Nikhil Banerjee
  • Pandit Omkarnath Thakur
  • Begum Parveen Sultana
  • Ustad Rais Khan
  • Pandit Ravi Shankar
  • S. Balachander
  • Pandit Samta Prasad
  • Semmangudi R. Srinivasa Iyer
  • Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma
  • Shobha Gurtu
  • T.R. Mahalingam
  • Pandit V.G. Jog
  • Ustad Vilayat Khan

There are short chapters on duets between the following artists at the end:

  • Ustad Alla Rakha and Ustad Zakhir Hussain
  • Pandit Bhimsen Joshi and Dr. M. Balamuralikrishna
  • Ustad Bismillah Khan and Ustad Amjad Ali Khan
  • Ustad Ali Akbar Khan and Pandit Ravi Shankar
  • Ustad Rais Khan and Ustad Sultan Khan
  • Ustad Vilayat Khan and Ustad Bismillah Khan

2009-10 Music Season Musings

December is the month many Carnatic music lovers, look forward to, for it is in December that the annual music season begins.

This year’s season has been very fulfilling for me as I, despite a hectic schedule at work,

  • managed to attend many concerts of two of my favorite vocalists – in fact attended almost all the concerts of one of them,
  • attended concerts of my favorite mrudangam artists,
  • attended many lec dems, some of which were very interesting and well presented (will post about these lec dems in detail in due course of time),
  • attended concerts of many “young artists” (for lack of a better term) and almost attended all the concerts of one of them whom I absolutely loved listening to,
  • met many friends/ fellow rasikas who live outside Chennai but manage to drop in religiously almost every year for the music season,
  • splurged on the annual music season sale, and
  • last but not the least, performed in concerts that added to the learning and to the experience

Some things that I felt could still be improved are:

  • accessibility to sabhas/ stage for the physically handicapped (Erode Nagaraj had written about it earlier at http://erodenagaraj.blogspot.com/2009/11/access-denied.html)
  • acoustics in many of the halls/auditoriums
  • sticking to time allotted for concerts by the artists
  • cleanliness of the toilets in many venues
  • quality of food and service at many of the canteens, especially when the demand is high
  • sensibility on the part of the listeners (ex. avoiding speaking on mobile phones and keeping mobile phones switched off or on silent/vibrate mode while listening to a concert, avoiding loud conversations inside the hall where a concert is on etc)

It’s really saddening to see the season draw to a close. But as they say, all good things must come to an end.

Let me take this opportunity to wish you all a great year ahead!